How Long Will This Take? “Two Weeks…”

In the past, I’ve compared looking for a new job to playing the dating game. You’re ultimately trying to find a new spark and connection that will hopefully lead to commitment. This isn’t an easy process. Whether you are dating different people or going on two job interviews per week, the time and energy spent can be exhausting. Most times you want to have an instant spark so you can move on with your new relationship.

The problem is that nothing moves fast. I’ve told you that part before. You can expect to possibly be on the job hunt around six to eight months. But, I wanted to expand on job hunting a little bit and let you in on a little secret. There’s a secret code phrase used in the HR and job hunt world that is thrown around like candy. At first it will give you hope, but ultimately you will know that it just means more waiting. You better get used to hearing one phrase…“two weeks.”

Two weeks. Doesn’t sound that bad does it? It sounds like a perfectly reasonable time frame and speed at which a big decision such as a hiring should take. It’s just like Tom Hanks in The Money Pit though, and “two weeks” starts to become just a saying, not a reality. Two weeks is about the fastest anyone will move, and many times I’ve learned the phrase can be a place holder so they have something to tell you when you ask about the timeline for a decision.

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From the initial contact you have with a potential employer, to scheduling that first interview, to ultimately meeting the hiring manager in person (if you make it that far), you will need to allow at least two weeks. You just have to. You must be aware of that and be prepared to play the long game.

All companies move at different speeds, and more often than not each speed is slower than the last one you encountered. Even if a company appears to be nearing a decision quickly, I can almost guarantee you that just the decision making process alone may take at least two weeks.

You must understand there are many factors at play in a process like this. You also have to remember you’re not always aware of what is happening on the side of the employer or with the hiring manager. The hiring manager may be playing by a set of rules they can’t control that is dictated by internal factors. Maybe something came up personally for one of the people involved and the decision is delayed. This type of information may or may not be relayed to you.

This is why it is important to build a solid relationships with your point of contact at HR. In my experiences, most HR professionals are very helpful and will guide you through the process if you keep in touch with them regularly. Ask questions about the company or position each time, along with the status of the pending decision. Ask them how they are and be conversational. I would pass this advice to anyone. You can never reach out to the HR folks enough while waiting for a decision. It will show your willingness to work for them.

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I recently had an experience where I was interviewing in person for the second time. I felt like I had played all of my cards right and this was going to be the engagement that sealed the deal. I was their guy and was about to begin a new working relationship. He assured me that they were moving quickly because they needed to fill this position to begin some new marketing initiatives. When I asked him “how quick” is “quick” he said I’ll be making a decision “this week.”

That interview was on a Wednesday. Even though I knew that was an ambitious timeline and was a bit skeptical, who was I to not take him at his word. Then Friday came and went with no word from HR. I reached out to HR on the following Monday and was assured no decision had been made. I reached out to HR again heading into the weekend and got the same assurance. But now one week had passed.

The next Monday went by with no word. I reached out on Wednesday to HR for an update and still was told they had no update because the hiring manager hadn’t told them of his decision. So now “quick” is at the ever-popular two week mark. It wasn’t until the following week, nearly three weeks later, when I was finally told of the decision. And sadly for me, I wasn’t the one chosen. However, because of my relationship with the HR contact, I didn’t feel like I was being strung along. I trusted her that there were factors beyond her control delaying the decision.

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I tell you all this not to scare you or come off as bitter or cynical. I’m telling you this to prepare you for the grind that is the job hunt. You can’t allow the long process to get you down. You must persevere and use the tools I’ve been equipping you with to stay positive. For me that has been utilizing my network of support, praying, eating right, working out and writing for outlets such as this one.

Because I have stayed true to my beliefs and my approach, I know that I am nearing a breakthrough in my search. Even if it has taken a long time to make some gains, I feel like I’m about to leap over the goal line for a touchdown.

If anyone else is tired of constantly hearing “two weeks” and would like to discuss how to stay aggressive on the job hunt, feel free to reach out in the comments, on Twitter or drop me a line. As I’ve stated before, I’m no expert, nor do I have all the answers. But through my writing and experiences, I hope to be able to help someone facing a similar situation. If I can help anyone, in any way, I’d be more than happy!

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