10 Apps Millennials Actually Use

There are countless mobile apps on the market today. Just visit the App Store or Google Play and you could spend countless hours scrolling through apps of many kinds. When it comes to apps for higher education, people tend to think of just ways apps can be used in the classroom or for curriculum, but that’s not all there is to it.

I know there are many other helpful apps out there that today’s college students can’t live without. How do I know this? Well, I polled a current crop of interns and part-time workers, most of whom are recent graduates or current students.

The apps listed below were unanimously used by our group of millennials. We will call it our list of the 10 apps college students actually use. I guess you could say they couldn’t survive college in today’s atmosphere without them.

University App – It doesn’t matter what college or university you attend; it will have an official app you can download to your phone. In our case, our group unanimously used the Auburn University app to stay up to date with what was happening in and around campus. Most apps also allow you to view your schedule and grades, keep up with news and events, and look up contact information for students and faculty.

Transit App – Likewise with University App, our entire group used the app that helped them track the campus transit system. Auburn’s app provides real-time location and next stop information as well as a small map for all active vehicles and routes. You can even access announcements that might impact your ride.

Moodle/Blackboard/Canvas – These learning management apps are all similar and serve virtually the same purpose, a way for you to track and stay current with your curriculum, courses and grades anywhere you go. Particularly, Auburn uses Canvas which includes course materials, including syllabi, lecture notes or slides, assignment submissions, files and links to external sources, and audio-video content.

Amazon Prime Student – Our millennial workers all took advantage of the discounts available on Amazon Prime. With the “Student” program you receive a 6-month Free trial that includes Free Two-Day Shipping on eligible purchases. You’ll also receive access to unlimited photo storage through Prime Photos, as well as Student-exclusive deals and discounts. After your 6-month free trial ends, your Prime Student membership makes you eligible to receive 50% off Amazon Prime, including all Prime benefits, for up to four years or until you are no longer a student. Sounds like a pretty good deal for the ever-frugal college student.

Venmo – Venmo is a free application that links your device with your bank account to make it easier for you to pay back money without having to deal with cash. With its help, you can share your payments with friends, collect money from people who owe it to you, pay your bills, and much more.

GroupMe – GroupMe is the free group messaging app that acts as a private chat room for your small group. Our millennials proclaimed this app essential for coordinating group projects in order to schedule meetings and update responsibilities, etc. when collaborating on a project. The app allows for sharing videos, photos, emojis, your location and even direct messages. Another plus, the app is available on both iOS and Android, eliminating the possibility for Android group members to be left out of an iMessage group text.

Google Docs – Google Docs is also the most commonly used file sharing app among our young workers. Google Docs allows users to create and edit group documents whenever and wherever, in real time. Editing permissions allow those with access to edit and style documents and all changes are instantly viewable to everyone with access to the document. We were told that students today aren’t sure how they’d get group projects done without the real-time collaboration of Google Docs.

Quizlet – This online learning tool is essentially a memorization aid. It lets users create “sets” of terms customized for their own needs. These sets of terms can then be studied under several study modes. The most popular study mode for our team was “flash cards.” In it, users are shown a “card” for each term. Users can click to flip over the card, or use their arrow keys, and see the definition for that term.

Chegg – Chegg is a multi-faceted app that featured textbook rentals, homework help, and online tutoring. While not a free app, Chegg was made to seem invaluable by the majority of our team members. It allows you to connect with tutors instantly, as well as get instant answers to a variety of educational questions. Step-by-step textbook solutions for your hardest classes are also easily available.

TinyScan/Scannable – These apps, essentially the same but one’s for Android and one’s for iOS, turn your smart phone into a mini scanner for documents, photos, receipts and other texts. With TinyScan, you can scan your documents, like your classmate’s notes on a lecture you missed, at anywhere and store or email them as PDF files. Sending and exchanging PDF files can sometimes be cumbersome, or not achievable at all, on many smart phones. These apps simplify document delivery and were used by more than half of our current staff.

It’s funny, when researching other articles for this piece, we asked our team members if they thought the apps listed in those pieces were accurate or even representative of today’s student. The majority of them said no. In fact, most apps listed drew blank stares or looks of bewilderment.

My goal with this list was to paint a more accurate representation of the 10 apps college students actually use to navigate today’s collegiate landscape. In most cases, the millennial workers said these were the apps a college student can’t live without.

So, let’s consider this the definitive article on the subject shall we? 

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This blog was originally posted by Verge Pipe Media.